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A man stands amid debris in front of a residential apartment complex that was heavily damaged by a Russian attack on March 18, 2022 in Kyiv, Ukraine.
A man stands amid debris in front of a residential apartment complex that was heavily damaged by a Russian attack on March 18, 2022 in Kyiv, Ukraine. © © Chris McGrath/Getty Images
Ukrainian servicemen walk in the destroyed street on April 4, 2022 in Bucha, Ukraine. The Ukrainian government has accused Russian forces of committing a "deliberate massacre" as they occupied and eventually retreated from Bucha, 25km northwest of Kyiv.
Ukrainian servicemen walk in the destroyed street on April 4, 2022 in Bucha, Ukraine. The Ukrainian government has accused Russian forces of committing a "deliberate massacre" as they occupied and eventually retreated from Bucha, 25km northwest of Kyiv. © Anastasia Vlasova/Getty Images
Journalists are seen working on the doorstep of an hotel on Maidan Square on March 1, 2022 in Kyiv, Ukraine.
Journalists are seen working on the doorstep of an hotel on Maidan Square on March 1, 2022 in Kyiv, Ukraine. © Pierre Crom/Getty Images
Smoke rises from a fire at an industrial facility after Russian military attack in the area on March 26, 2022 in Lviv, Ukraine.
Smoke rises from a fire at an industrial facility after Russian military attack in the area on March 26, 2022 in Lviv, Ukraine. © Joe Raedle/Getty Images
A volunteer takes a break in the Science Center on March 10, 2022 in Ternopil, Ukraine. Science Center of Ternopil became the office where volunteers gather and send supplies for the internally displaced persons, and to cities and towns experiencing a humanitarian catastrophe.
A volunteer takes a break in the Science Center on March 10, 2022 in Ternopil, Ukraine. Science Center of Ternopil became the office where volunteers gather and send supplies for the internally displaced persons, and to cities and towns experiencing a humanitarian catastrophe. © Alexey Furman/Getty Images
Local journalists at work in central station on March 2, 2022 in Kyiv, Ukraine.
Local journalists at work in central station on March 2, 2022 in Kyiv, Ukraine. © Pierre Crom/Getty Images
A girl sits with her dog and cat in the Dorohozhychi subway station which has has been turned into a bomb shelter on March 02, 2022 in Kyiv, Ukraine.
A girl sits with her dog and cat in the Dorohozhychi subway station which has has been turned into a bomb shelter on March 02, 2022 in Kyiv, Ukraine. © Chris McGrath/Getty Images
A man rides his bike past destroyed buildings on March 03, 2022 in Irpin, Ukraine.
A man rides his bike past destroyed buildings on March 03, 2022 in Irpin, Ukraine. © Chris McGrath/Getty Images
Passengers depart the railway station after disembarking trains from the east on March 11, 2022 in Lviv, Ukraine.
Passengers depart the railway station after disembarking trains from the east on March 11, 2022 in Lviv, Ukraine. © Dan Kitwood/Getty Images
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Disinformation is a major global threat , especially in conflict and post-conflict areas. IWPR performs a vital mission, building up local voices as a bulwark against this challenge.

Dr Karin von Hippel

Director General, Royal United Services Institute for Defence and Security Studies

Democratic accountability comes from journalists investigating their own societies – IWPR provides a much needed platform and support for those reporting from some of the most dangerous and difficult places in the world.

Lindsey Hilsum

International Editor, Channel 4 News

IWPR fills a critical gap by helping local journalists to focus on human rights and justice issues. In the process, it contributes to democratic transitions, and demonstrates that the best war reporting is not about military conflict, but human consequences.

Samantha Power

Former United States Ambassador to the United Nations; Pulitzer Prize-winning author
Vasyl leaves the battlefield after being wounded. He lost his son, a soldier, in early March.
Vasyl leaves the battlefield after being wounded. He lost his son, a soldier, in early March. © Anatoliy Stepanov
Russian T-72 tank on fire after a clash with the armed forces of Ukraine, Lugansk region.
Russian T-72 tank on fire after a clash with the armed forces of Ukraine, Lugansk region. © Anatoliy Stepanov
A Ukrainian MLRS Grad is shot from Ukrainian positions in Luhansk region.
A Ukrainian MLRS Grad is shot from Ukrainian positions in Luhansk region. © Anatoliy Stepanov
Ukrainian soldiers fight near the village of Zolote, Lugansk region.
Ukrainian soldiers fight near the village of Zolote, Lugansk region. © Anatoliy Stepanov
A Ukrainian soldier walks near a destroyed Russian tank in the village of Gusarovka, in Kharkiv region.
A Ukrainian soldier walks near a destroyed Russian tank in the village of Gusarovka, in Kharkiv region. © Anatoliy Stepanov
A soldier's boot splattered with blood in the waiting room of a military hospital in Kramatorsk, north of Donetsk.
A soldier's boot splattered with blood in the waiting room of a military hospital in Kramatorsk, north of Donetsk. © Anatoliy Stepanov
A Ukrainian tanker surfaces from the military vehicle after a successful battle south of Kharkiv region.
A Ukrainian tanker surfaces from the military vehicle after a successful battle south of Kharkiv region. © Anatoliy Stepanov
A Ukrainian soldier walks past a missile from the MLRS Uragan at a frontline position near Izyum. The town, about 124 kilometres south of Kharkiv, was the site of a fierce battle as Russian sought to control it due to its importance as a transport node.
A Ukrainian soldier walks past a missile from the MLRS Uragan at a frontline position near Izyum. The town, about 124 kilometres south of Kharkiv, was the site of a fierce battle as Russian sought to control it due to its importance as a transport node. © Anatoliy Stepanov
Ukrainian soldiers preparing for an attack in Luhansk region.
Ukrainian soldiers preparing for an attack in Luhansk region. © Anatoliy Stepanov
Ukrainian artillerymen rest at their positions in the Lugansk region.
Ukrainian artillerymen rest at their positions in the Lugansk region. © Anatoliy Stepanov
A military medic and police officers try to help people after a rocket attack on the railway station in Kramatorsk, a city with a pre-war population of 157,000, north of Donetsk, eastern Ukraine.
A military medic and police officers try to help people after a rocket attack on the railway station in Kramatorsk, a city with a pre-war population of 157,000, north of Donetsk, eastern Ukraine. © Anatoliy Stepanov
Eva plays with her kitten near the shelter where she lives with her mother and brother in the city of Rubizhne, about 117 kilometres north of Luhansk.
Eva plays with her kitten near the shelter where she lives with her mother and brother in the city of Rubizhne, about 117 kilometres north of Luhansk. © Anatoliy Stepanov
A resident of the city of Lysychansk walks past the remains of a Smerch rocket on a city street in April.
A resident of the city of Lysychansk walks past the remains of a Smerch rocket on a city street in April. © Anatoliy Stepanov
Residents of Lysychansk examine the crater from the explosion of a FAB 500 air bomb in the courtyard of a multi-storey building in mid-April.
Residents of Lysychansk examine the crater from the explosion of a FAB 500 air bomb in the courtyard of a multi-storey building in mid-April. © Anatoliy Stepanov
Kharkiv residents in the city’s Geroev Pratsi metro station. Many families have sheltered in metro stations for over two months.
Kharkiv residents in the city’s Geroev Pratsi metro station. Many families have sheltered in metro stations for over two months. © Anatoliy Stepanov
Residents of Lyman, a town controlled by the Russian-backed separatists of the so-called Donetsk People’s Republic, in an armoured bus during the evacuation of the village of Rayhorodka, Donetsk region.
Residents of Lyman, a town controlled by the Russian-backed separatists of the so-called Donetsk People’s Republic, in an armoured bus during the evacuation of the village of Rayhorodka, Donetsk region. © Anatoliy Stepanov
Volunteers carry Lyman resident Nina Tikhomirova on a stretcher into an ambulance during her evacuation from the village of Raigorodka, Donetsk region.
Volunteers carry Lyman resident Nina Tikhomirova on a stretcher into an ambulance during her evacuation from the village of Raigorodka, Donetsk region. © Anatoliy Stepanov
A private house destroyed by an artillery shell in the village of Mykolaivka, Donetsk region.
A private house destroyed by an artillery shell in the village of Mykolaivka, Donetsk region. © Anatoliy Stepanov
Employees of Ukraine’s state emergency situations service help a disabled person during the evacuation of civilians at the railway station in the city of Pokrovsk, in Donetsk region.
Employees of Ukraine’s state emergency situations service help a disabled person during the evacuation of civilians at the railway station in the city of Pokrovsk, in Donetsk region. © Anatoliy Stepanov
Residents of Severodonetsk hide in the basement of a house during artillery shelling.
Residents of Severodonetsk hide in the basement of a house during artillery shelling. © Anatoliy Stepanov
A wounded resident of Severodonetsk in the hospital before surgery. A shell exploded in his yard in April.
A wounded resident of Severodonetsk in the hospital before surgery. A shell exploded in his yard in April. © Anatoliy Stepanov
Residents of Severodonetsk come out of hiding after shelling, four days after Russia launched its full-scale invasion of Ukraine.
Residents of Severodonetsk come out of hiding after shelling, four days after Russia launched its full-scale invasion of Ukraine.
An apartment building in Bakhmut destroyed by rocket fire on June 13, 2022. Civilians feel the onslaught of advancing Russian troops in the city located about 60 kilometres south-west of Severodonetsk and is located on the main road leading to the city at the epicentre of the fighting.
An apartment building in Bakhmut destroyed by rocket fire on June 13, 2022. Civilians feel the onslaught of advancing Russian troops in the city located about 60 kilometres south-west of Severodonetsk and is located on the main road leading to the city at the epicentre of the fighting. © Anatoliy Stepanov
Stela Gevorgyan, 37, and her mother lived with a relative when the earthquake hit. The extended family was made homeless, but Gevorgyan’s mother managed to move into the shelter. Her mother died in late 2021 and the daughter still lives there alone.
Stela Gevorgyan, 37, and her mother lived with a relative when the earthquake hit. The extended family was made homeless, but Gevorgyan’s mother managed to move into the shelter. Her mother died in late 2021 and the daughter still lives there alone. © Armine Avetisyan
Stela Gevorgyan has lived in her 15-square-metre since she was four. It has no private bathroom, running water or heating. She has been saving for years, but cannot afford to purchase an apartment.
Stela Gevorgyan has lived in her 15-square-metre since she was four. It has no private bathroom, running water or heating. She has been saving for years, but cannot afford to purchase an apartment. © Armine Avetisyan
As there is no water in the cottage, Stela Gevorgyan uses the connection from a neighbour to do the laundry. She uses the public baths to shower.
As there is no water in the cottage, Stela Gevorgyan uses the connection from a neighbour to do the laundry. She uses the public baths to shower. © Armine Avetisyan
Stela Gevorgyan with her two dogs.
Stela Gevorgyan with her two dogs. © Armine Avetisyan
Prior to the earthquake, Zhanna Zhamakochyan, now 71, lived in a rented house. After the disaster, she and her family lived in various shelters including a garage. They also slept rough. In 1991 they managed to settle in a domik and received a temporary registration.
Prior to the earthquake, Zhanna Zhamakochyan, now 71, lived in a rented house. After the disaster, she and her family lived in various shelters including a garage. They also slept rough. In 1991 they managed to settle in a domik and received a temporary registration. © Armine Avetisyan
Zhanna Zhamakochyan’s shelter is part of a series that were set up to house Russian builders who had come to Gyumri for the reconstruction effort. It is a series of two-storey caravans where scores of families still live.
Zhanna Zhamakochyan’s shelter is part of a series that were set up to house Russian builders who had come to Gyumri for the reconstruction effort. It is a series of two-storey caravans where scores of families still live. © Armine Avetisyan
The roof of the house is worn out. The cottage always smells of mould.
The roof of the house is worn out. The cottage always smells of mould. © Armine Avetisyan
Yasha Manukyan,Zhanna Zhamakochyan’s husband, is 83 and has health problems. “I have one foot in a rotten cottage and the other in the cemetery,” he said. He does not believe that he will live long enough for their temporary registration to be replaced by a permanent one, and for the rotten house to be replaced by a normal one.
Yasha Manukyan,Zhanna Zhamakochyan’s husband, is 83 and has health problems. “I have one foot in a rotten cottage and the other in the cemetery,” he said. He does not believe that he will live long enough for their temporary registration to be replaced by a permanent one, and for the rotten house to be replaced by a normal one. © Armine Avetisyan
Tatev Harutyunyan has spent her entire life in the temporary shelter. At 34, she is a mother of two and saddened that her dream of a permanent home has been passed onto her children.
Tatev Harutyunyan has spent her entire life in the temporary shelter. At 34, she is a mother of two and saddened that her dream of a permanent home has been passed onto her children. © Armine Avetisyan
Unlike other domiks, Tatev Harutyunyan’s home has heating.
Unlike other domiks, Tatev Harutyunyan’s home has heating. © Armine Avetisyan
Each cottage is marked with the address of the shelter registration number. Once residents can move into proper accommodation, they receive a permanent address. Harutyunyan remains optimistic that her family will have a forever home.
Each cottage is marked with the address of the shelter registration number. Once residents can move into proper accommodation, they receive a permanent address. Harutyunyan remains optimistic that her family will have a forever home. © Armine Avetisyan
64-year-old Samvel Alvanjyan received an apartment as compensation but he was then forced to sell it. “We had health issues, we needed the money,” he explained.
64-year-old Samvel Alvanjyan received an apartment as compensation but he was then forced to sell it. “We had health issues, we needed the money,” he explained. © Armine Avetisyan
Alvanjyan lives in this cottage with his wife, their son, daughter-in-law and two grandchildren. They have come to terms with the fact that this shelter is their permanent home. They have improved the cottage as much as they can, they only get upset during the winter months as it gets cold.
Alvanjyan lives in this cottage with his wife, their son, daughter-in-law and two grandchildren. They have come to terms with the fact that this shelter is their permanent home. They have improved the cottage as much as they can, they only get upset during the winter months as it gets cold. © Armine Avetisyan
The family does not have enough money to heat the house so collect newspapers and cardboard boxes throughout the year to burn in this rudimentary stove.
The family does not have enough money to heat the house so collect newspapers and cardboard boxes throughout the year to burn in this rudimentary stove. © Armine Avetisyan
There are residents who received apartments years ago but decided to remain in the shelters and rent the flats out to have an income. There are also people who have moved out but retained the temporary registration and rent out the cottages.
There are residents who received apartments years ago but decided to remain in the shelters and rent the flats out to have an income. There are also people who have moved out but retained the temporary registration and rent out the cottages. © Armine Avetisyan
Gohar Grigoryan, 61, was born in Gyumri. She lost her house during the earthquake, received compensation from the state, then sold everything and moved to Nagorny Karabakh. During the 2020 war, she was forced to flee and her house fell under the control of Azerbaijan.
Gohar Grigoryan, 61, was born in Gyumri. She lost her house during the earthquake, received compensation from the state, then sold everything and moved to Nagorny Karabakh. During the 2020 war, she was forced to flee and her house fell under the control of Azerbaijan. © Armine Avetisyan
The shelter that Gohar Grigoryan rents is unhealthy and dilapidated. She pays 30,000 Armenian drams (50 US dollars) a month.
The shelter that Gohar Grigoryan rents is unhealthy and dilapidated. She pays 30,000 Armenian drams (50 US dollars) a month. © Armine Avetisyan
Not all cottages built after the earthquake are inhabited. About 508 of registered ones are vacant. Authorities are dismantling those left vacant by residents who managed to move onto permanent houses.
Not all cottages built after the earthquake are inhabited. About 508 of registered ones are vacant. Authorities are dismantling those left vacant by residents who managed to move onto permanent houses. © Armine Avetisyan
The ruins of Petro's house after it was hit by four rockets.
The ruins of Petro's house after it was hit by four rockets. © IWPR
The wreckage of a bridge en route to the Polis’kyi region.
The wreckage of a bridge en route to the Polis’kyi region. © IWPR
Destroyed military equipment scattered across the road on the drive from Kyiv.
Destroyed military equipment scattered across the road on the drive from Kyiv. © IWPR
Leftover Russian ammunition lies abandoned in Zirka.
Leftover Russian ammunition lies abandoned in Zirka. © IWPR
The Maryanivka community centre, decorated in the colours of the Ukrainian flag.
The Maryanivka community centre, decorated in the colours of the Ukrainian flag. © IWPR
Locals sit outside a typical wooden house in Zirka.
Locals sit outside a typical wooden house in Zirka. © IWPR
Children play in the village of Rahivka, south west of Zirka.
Children play in the village of Rahivka, south west of Zirka. © IWPR
Lyudmyla Yankina (left) distributes aid in the village of Rahivka
Lyudmyla Yankina (left) distributes aid in the village of Rahivka © IWPR
Halyna Mykytivna Semenenko, a former factory and post-office worker in the village of Zirka.
Halyna Mykytivna Semenenko, a former factory and post-office worker in the village of Zirka. © IWPR
Ruslana Morina (centre), a primary school teacher, stands with fellow locals.
Ruslana Morina (centre), a primary school teacher, stands with fellow locals.
A house in the village of Zirka.
A house in the village of Zirka.
Ihor Denysiuk, a builder and beekeeper in the village of Zirka.
Ihor Denysiuk, a builder and beekeeper in the village of Zirka. © IWPR
A water tower decnrated in the colours of the national flag lies destroyed in Zirka.
A water tower decnrated in the colours of the national flag lies destroyed in Zirka. © IWPR
A poster advertising tours of the Chernobyl former nuclear site.
A poster advertising tours of the Chernobyl former nuclear site. © IWPR
Storks come to nest in Zirka village.
Storks come to nest in Zirka village. © IWPR
The remnants of a Russian base lie abandoned in Luhovyky.
The remnants of a Russian base lie abandoned in Luhovyky. © IWPR
All that was left of an improvised base for Russian soldiers in Luhovyky.
All that was left of an improvised base for Russian soldiers in Luhovyky. © IWPR
The Russian soldiers left scattered remnants of equipment behind when they moved on from in Luhovyky.
The Russian soldiers left scattered remnants of equipment behind when they moved on from in Luhovyky.
Women, children and elderly people make up the vast majority of those heading abroad, as men between 18 and 60 years of age are barred from leaving Ukraine.
Women, children and elderly people make up the vast majority of those heading abroad, as men between 18 and 60 years of age are barred from leaving Ukraine. © Oleksandr Solonenko
Olena Guzyova with her three children aged 12, eight and one year. She fled Shchastya, a town of 12,000 people near the contact line in Luhansk region shortly before the town came under heavy shelling. They are headed to Italy where Olena’s sister lives.
Olena Guzyova with her three children aged 12, eight and one year. She fled Shchastya, a town of 12,000 people near the contact line in Luhansk region shortly before the town came under heavy shelling. They are headed to Italy where Olena’s sister lives. © Oleksandr Solonenko
Entire lives are packed into a few suitcases as people flee their homes.
Entire lives are packed into a few suitcases as people flee their homes. © Oleksandr Solonenko
Sport centres, warehouses, shops and theatres have been transformed into shelters to accommodate Ukrainians fleeing across the country. Aid organisations and city authorities coordinate accommodation, medical assistance, warm meals and aid items.
Sport centres, warehouses, shops and theatres have been transformed into shelters to accommodate Ukrainians fleeing across the country. Aid organisations and city authorities coordinate accommodation, medical assistance, warm meals and aid items. © Oleksandr Solonenko
Ludwig Silven Tumnoue hugs his son Daniel in the Lviv shelter where they arrived after a 23-hour journey from eastern Ukraine. The 48-year-old moved from Cameroon to Ukraine 22 years ago as a university student.
Ludwig Silven Tumnoue hugs his son Daniel in the Lviv shelter where they arrived after a 23-hour journey from eastern Ukraine. The 48-year-old moved from Cameroon to Ukraine 22 years ago as a university student. © Oleksandr Solonenko
Ludwig Silven Tumnoue with his wife Natalya and 12-year-old son Daniel. The family is heading to Poland and once there will decide where to go. Cameroon, Tumnoue’s native country, is not an option due to boy’s special needs which require medical assistance not available there.
Ludwig Silven Tumnoue with his wife Natalya and 12-year-old son Daniel. The family is heading to Poland and once there will decide where to go. Cameroon, Tumnoue’s native country, is not an option due to boy’s special needs which require medical assistance not available there. © Oleksandr Solonenko
Nurlan with his wife Yulia and their daughter Nikita. The family has lived in Odesa for a decade after leaving their native Kazakstan due to the persecution the 67-year-old faced due to his work as a journalist.
Nurlan with his wife Yulia and their daughter Nikita. The family has lived in Odesa for a decade after leaving their native Kazakstan due to the persecution the 67-year-old faced due to his work as a journalist. © Oleksandr Solonenko
Kateryna Sergeyeva and her son Maxim left Kyiv after the TV tower was bombed in early March, claiming the lives of five people. The 45-year-old former athlete turned fitness coach will stay in Poland at a friend’s house.
Kateryna Sergeyeva and her son Maxim left Kyiv after the TV tower was bombed in early March, claiming the lives of five people. The 45-year-old former athlete turned fitness coach will stay in Poland at a friend’s house. © Oleksandr Solonenko
Inna Dmytrenko fled with her seven-year-old daughter Veronika and 17-year-old son Ilya from Brovary, a suburb of Kyiv which was heavily shelled by the Russian forces. The 43-year-old left behind an older son who has joined the territorial defence units in the capital.
Inna Dmytrenko fled with her seven-year-old daughter Veronika and 17-year-old son Ilya from Brovary, a suburb of Kyiv which was heavily shelled by the Russian forces. The 43-year-old left behind an older son who has joined the territorial defence units in the capital. © Oleksandr Solonenko
Anna Kamenkova has been working in Italy for several years but returned to Kyiv for medical treatment and was in hospital when the invasion began. She moved to the basement of a friend’s house and then managed to reach Lviv. The 37-year-old chef is heading back to Italy with 22-year-old Anastasia Gotsulyak.
Anna Kamenkova has been working in Italy for several years but returned to Kyiv for medical treatment and was in hospital when the invasion began. She moved to the basement of a friend’s house and then managed to reach Lviv. The 37-year-old chef is heading back to Italy with 22-year-old Anastasia Gotsulyak. © Oleksandr Solonenko
A journalist student in Kyiv, 22-year-old Anastasiya Gotsulyak is originally from Mykolayiv, a strategic port city in southern Ukraine. Her parents are close friends of Anna Kamenkova’s and she has joined her in her journey back to Italy.
A journalist student in Kyiv, 22-year-old Anastasiya Gotsulyak is originally from Mykolayiv, a strategic port city in southern Ukraine. Her parents are close friends of Anna Kamenkova’s and she has joined her in her journey back to Italy. © Oleksandr Solonenko
A kitten peeks from a bundle of blankets and backpacks. Many Ukrainians have endured long journeys with their pets.
A kitten peeks from a bundle of blankets and backpacks. Many Ukrainians have endured long journeys with their pets. © Oleksandr Solonenko
Two children stare out of the window as the evacuation train leaves Lviv and heads to the Polish border.
Two children stare out of the window as the evacuation train leaves Lviv and heads to the Polish border. © Oleksandr Solonenko
A train leaves for Przemysl, the Polish town on the border with Ukraine most refugees have been passing through as they flee Russia’s invasion.
A train leaves for Przemysl, the Polish town on the border with Ukraine most refugees have been passing through as they flee Russia’s invasion. © Oleksandr Solonenko
Volunteers with yellow ribbons and vests help people to board the evacuation train, making sure that families are not separated. Upon their arrival at the border, refugees can go to an emergency shelter or continue to other destinations across Poland and beyond.
Volunteers with yellow ribbons and vests help people to board the evacuation train, making sure that families are not separated. Upon their arrival at the border, refugees can go to an emergency shelter or continue to other destinations across Poland and beyond. © Oleksandr Solonenko
The staircase leading up to the platforms forms a chokepoint due to the sheer volume of people and their luggage.
The staircase leading up to the platforms forms a chokepoint due to the sheer volume of people and their luggage. © Oleksandr Solonenko
Volunteers distribute baby food on the platform where hundreds await the train heading to Poland.
Volunteers distribute baby food on the platform where hundreds await the train heading to Poland. © Oleksandr Solonenko
A child cries as her family is about to board the train, leaving the father behind.
A child cries as her family is about to board the train, leaving the father behind. © Oleksandr Solonenko
A man waves to his family from the platform. Men between 18 and 60 years of age are banned from leaving the country.
A man waves to his family from the platform. Men between 18 and 60 years of age are banned from leaving the country. © Oleksandr Solonenko
Kartli was built in Soviet times as a sanatorium for patients with heart conditions. As hundreds of thousands of Georgians fled Abkhazia at the end of the conflict in late 1993, authorities allocated about 200 families housing there in what was supposed to be a temporary measure. Thirty years on, 130 are still there.
Kartli was built in Soviet times as a sanatorium for patients with heart conditions. As hundreds of thousands of Georgians fled Abkhazia at the end of the conflict in late 1993, authorities allocated about 200 families housing there in what was supposed to be a temporary measure. Thirty years on, 130 are still there. © David Mdzinarishvili
Residents of the Soviet-era sanatorium-turned-collective centre Kartli protest against dire living conditions in front of the ministry of internally displaced persons from the occupied territories.
Residents of the Soviet-era sanatorium-turned-collective centre Kartli protest against dire living conditions in front of the ministry of internally displaced persons from the occupied territories. © David Mdzinarishvili
Neighbours chat in one of the corridors; laundry hangs in the background. The 14-square-metre rooms were meant to house a maximum of two people at a time, but since the 1990s have been home to entire families.
Neighbours chat in one of the corridors; laundry hangs in the background. The 14-square-metre rooms were meant to house a maximum of two people at a time, but since the 1990s have been home to entire families. © David Mdzinarishvili
Nanuli Shulaia, 62, is originally from Sokumi, Abkhazia’s capital city. In January, debris fell from the ceiling, narrowly missing her grandson. “We temporarily moved the kids to our relatives – staying here is very risky. New cracks appear on the wall every day, while the existing ones grow even deeper,” she said.
Nanuli Shulaia, 62, is originally from Sokumi, Abkhazia’s capital city. In January, debris fell from the ceiling, narrowly missing her grandson. “We temporarily moved the kids to our relatives – staying here is very risky. New cracks appear on the wall every day, while the existing ones grow even deeper,” she said. © David Mdzinarishvili
Nanuli Shulaia. There is no natural gas in the building. Most of the IDPs get their heating from pellet stoves or electric heating. This is not enough to dry up the damp walls.
Nanuli Shulaia. There is no natural gas in the building. Most of the IDPs get their heating from pellet stoves or electric heating. This is not enough to dry up the damp walls. © David Mdzinarishvili
Nanuli Shulaia in her room. “In Sokhumi, I left a three-bedroom apartment and two-storey house. When we came here, I started crying – how could we fit into one room? My mother-in-law reassured me that we’d survive here a few months and then go back home. I was 32 then, I am 62 now,” she said.
Nanuli Shulaia in her room. “In Sokhumi, I left a three-bedroom apartment and two-storey house. When we came here, I started crying – how could we fit into one room? My mother-in-law reassured me that we’d survive here a few months and then go back home. I was 32 then, I am 62 now,” she said. © David Mdzinarishvili
A resident of the Kartli complex folds laundry in a corridor where residents hang up clothes since the rooms are too small.
A resident of the Kartli complex folds laundry in a corridor where residents hang up clothes since the rooms are too small. © David Mdzinarishvili
The sanatorium-turned-collective centre stands by the so-called Tbilisi Sea, an artificial lake that serves as the capital’s water reservoir.
The sanatorium-turned-collective centre stands by the so-called Tbilisi Sea, an artificial lake that serves as the capital’s water reservoir. © David Mdzinarishvili
Irma Nachkebia, 52, from Sokhumi, shows the crumbling conditions of the building.
Irma Nachkebia, 52, from Sokhumi, shows the crumbling conditions of the building. © David Mdzinarishvili
Irma Nachkebia, 52, displays her abandoned house in Abkhazia on her phone. The photo was sent to her by acquaintances.
Irma Nachkebia, 52, displays her abandoned house in Abkhazia on her phone. The photo was sent to her by acquaintances. © David Mdzinarishvili
Irma Nachkebia and her neighbour Maluza Baghbaia, 54, from Ochamchire, watch videos of Sokhumi they found online.
Irma Nachkebia and her neighbour Maluza Baghbaia, 54, from Ochamchire, watch videos of Sokhumi they found online. © David Mdzinarishvili
Gela Ormotsadze, 38, and Diana Davlianidze, 49, discuss the government’s offer regarding their relocation. Prime Minister Irakli Gharibashvili offered IDPS in Kartli the possibility of either searching for a new place by themselves (the price must be maximum 550 US dollars per square metre) or waiting for housing due to be completed by the end of 2022. Before that, the government will provide 300 Georgian Lari (100 US dollars) per month to cover rent expenses.
Gela Ormotsadze, 38, and Diana Davlianidze, 49, discuss the government’s offer regarding their relocation. Prime Minister Irakli Gharibashvili offered IDPS in Kartli the possibility of either searching for a new place by themselves (the price must be maximum 550 US dollars per square metre) or waiting for housing due to be completed by the end of 2022. Before that, the government will provide 300 Georgian Lari (100 US dollars) per month to cover rent expenses. © David Mdzinarishvili
Gela Ormotsadze, 38, shows the deeply damaged walls in Kartli. The complex, comprising two buildings, is slowly collapsing as the foundations are fragile due to water infiltration.
Gela Ormotsadze, 38, shows the deeply damaged walls in Kartli. The complex, comprising two buildings, is slowly collapsing as the foundations are fragile due to water infiltration. © David Mdzinarishvili
Six-year-old Elene sits on the bed of in her aunt’s 14 sq metre room.
Six-year-old Elene sits on the bed of in her aunt’s 14 sq metre room. © David Mdzinarishvili
Diana Davlianidze, 49, looks out from the window by the banner, “Maybe at least you can be helped.” On January 16, Zurab Kiria, 52, an IDP, killed himself. According to his neighbours, his last words were, “Maybe at least you can be helped.”
Diana Davlianidze, 49, looks out from the window by the banner, “Maybe at least you can be helped.” On January 16, Zurab Kiria, 52, an IDP, killed himself. According to his neighbours, his last words were, “Maybe at least you can be helped.” © David Mdzinarishvili
Laundry hanging out to dry in the corridor of the former sanatorium.
Laundry hanging out to dry in the corridor of the former sanatorium. © David Mdzinarishvili
An old couch and broken watch in the hall in one of the two buildings of the Kartli complex.
An old couch and broken watch in the hall in one of the two buildings of the Kartli complex. © David Mdzinarishvili
A corner of the entrance hall of the Soviet sanatorium, which was turned into collective centre in 1992. What was supposed to be a temporary housing measure for the hundreds of thousands of Georgians fleeing Abkhazia turned into permanent housing.
A corner of the entrance hall of the Soviet sanatorium, which was turned into collective centre in 1992. What was supposed to be a temporary housing measure for the hundreds of thousands of Georgians fleeing Abkhazia turned into permanent housing. © David Mdzinarishvili
An internally displaced woman from Abkhazia hangs laundry from the window of her room in Kartli.
An internally displaced woman from Abkhazia hangs laundry from the window of her room in Kartli. © David Mdzinarishvili
Laundry and a three-wheeled bike in the entrance hall of the former sanatorium.
Laundry and a three-wheeled bike in the entrance hall of the former sanatorium. © David Mdzinarishvili
A woman stands in the centre of Tiraspol, holding a No War sign. Public opinion about the war remains divided: there are between 100,000 and 120,000 Ukrainians living in the region, but ties with Russia are strong.
A woman stands in the centre of Tiraspol, holding a No War sign. Public opinion about the war remains divided: there are between 100,000 and 120,000 Ukrainians living in the region, but ties with Russia are strong. © Alexander Udodov
Tents and temporary sanitary facilities were set up at Kuchurgan-Pervomaisk, the main crossing point between Transnistria and Ukraine, in Odesa region. Ukraine shut its side of the border on February 28.
Tents and temporary sanitary facilities were set up at Kuchurgan-Pervomaisk, the main crossing point between Transnistria and Ukraine, in Odesa region. Ukraine shut its side of the border on February 28. © Alexander Udodov
The Transnistrian side of the now-closed Kuchurgan-Pervomaisk crossing point with Ukraine. The closest village on the other side is Mayak, about three kilometres away. Transnistria has welcomed up to 6,000 refugees.
The Transnistrian side of the now-closed Kuchurgan-Pervomaisk crossing point with Ukraine. The closest village on the other side is Mayak, about three kilometres away. Transnistria has welcomed up to 6,000 refugees. © Alexander Udodov
Food and basic items to be distributed to Ukrainian refugees in Palanca, a Moldovan village about 65 km from the Black Sea port of Odesa.
Food and basic items to be distributed to Ukrainian refugees in Palanca, a Moldovan village about 65 km from the Black Sea port of Odesa. © Alexander Udodov
A sign says No War in a Tiraspol apartment hosting refugees from Ukraine. Authorities have allocated temporary housing for Ukrainians crossing into Transnistria, with many residents making their homes available.
A sign says No War in a Tiraspol apartment hosting refugees from Ukraine. Authorities have allocated temporary housing for Ukrainians crossing into Transnistria, with many residents making their homes available. © Alexander Udodov
Job advertisements to work in Moscow and other Russian cities are an everyday sight in Transnistria. An estimated one third of the territory’s residents work in Russia. Leaflets offering jobs in Poland are also becoming more common.
Job advertisements to work in Moscow and other Russian cities are an everyday sight in Transnistria. An estimated one third of the territory’s residents work in Russia. Leaflets offering jobs in Poland are also becoming more common. © Alexander Udodov
A Russian flag painted on an apartment block in a residential area. Ties with Russia are profound, and Russians are about 29 per cent of the region’s 473,000 residents, making them the largest group.
A Russian flag painted on an apartment block in a residential area. Ties with Russia are profound, and Russians are about 29 per cent of the region’s 473,000 residents, making them the largest group. © Alexander Udodov
A supermarket belonging to Sheriff Ltd, the region’s largest holding. The company, created in the mid-1990s by Viktor Gusan and Ilya Kazmaly, is said to control 60 per cent of the economy. It comprises supermarkets, gas stations, hotels, a mobile phone network, bakeries and a distillery as well as a mini media empire of radio and TV stations.
A supermarket belonging to Sheriff Ltd, the region’s largest holding. The company, created in the mid-1990s by Viktor Gusan and Ilya Kazmaly, is said to control 60 per cent of the economy. It comprises supermarkets, gas stations, hotels, a mobile phone network, bakeries and a distillery as well as a mini media empire of radio and TV stations. © Alexander Udodov
An old woman begs in central Tiraspol by the equestrian monument dedicated to Alexander Vasilyevich Suvorov, the Russian general who founded the city in 1792. Poverty is high, particularly among old people, and low salaries push hundreds out of the region every year in search of jobs.
An old woman begs in central Tiraspol by the equestrian monument dedicated to Alexander Vasilyevich Suvorov, the Russian general who founded the city in 1792. Poverty is high, particularly among old people, and low salaries push hundreds out of the region every year in search of jobs. © Alexander Udodov
A lone musician busks in the centre of Tiraspol by a sign indicating that all the money raised will be donated to refugee assistance.
A lone musician busks in the centre of Tiraspol by a sign indicating that all the money raised will be donated to refugee assistance. © Alexander Udodov
A billboard reads Transnistria is Founded to Live on the flag of the breakaway republic, the only one in the world that still bears the hammer and sickle insignia. The banner marks the 30th anniversary of the de facto authorities’ declaration of independence, on September 2, 1990.
A billboard reads Transnistria is Founded to Live on the flag of the breakaway republic, the only one in the world that still bears the hammer and sickle insignia. The banner marks the 30th anniversary of the de facto authorities’ declaration of independence, on September 2, 1990. © Alexander Udodov
The entrance of one of Russia’s two military bases in the region. There is also another base in the city of Bender, but ordinary people do not have access to it.
The entrance of one of Russia’s two military bases in the region. There is also another base in the city of Bender, but ordinary people do not have access to it. © Alexander Udodov
The officers’ quarters of the Russian army in Tiraspol.
The officers’ quarters of the Russian army in Tiraspol. © Alexander Udodov
People queue at the cash machine of one of the branches of the Russian Sberbank bank in Tiraspol.
People queue at the cash machine of one of the branches of the Russian Sberbank bank in Tiraspol. © Alexander Udodov
A woman wears a mask on a bus in Tiraspol. The region has been supplied with Covid-19 vaccines from both the Russian Federation and Moldova. The authorities offer vaccines to Ukrainian refugees who have not been immunised.
A woman wears a mask on a bus in Tiraspol. The region has been supplied with Covid-19 vaccines from both the Russian Federation and Moldova. The authorities offer vaccines to Ukrainian refugees who have not been immunised. © Alexandru Vengher
An elderly woman wears a mask on a bus in Tiraspol.
An elderly woman wears a mask on a bus in Tiraspol. © Alexandru Vengher
A bust of Lenin sits in front of the House of Soviets, one of Tiraspol’s landmarks and home to the city’s de facto local authorities. Built in the 1950s, the four-storey building features a massive ten-column portico.
A bust of Lenin sits in front of the House of Soviets, one of Tiraspol’s landmarks and home to the city’s de facto local authorities. Built in the 1950s, the four-storey building features a massive ten-column portico. © Alexander Udodov
An imperious statue of Lenin guards Transnistria’s Brutalist de facto parliament in Tiraspol.
An imperious statue of Lenin guards Transnistria’s Brutalist de facto parliament in Tiraspol. © Alexander Udodov
A bust of Lenin in front of an administrative building in Tiraspol, with the territory’s red-green-red flag. Featuring a golden hammer and sickle, it was the official flag of the Moldovan Soviet Socialist Republic until the fall of the USSR and was adopted by the region in 2000.
A bust of Lenin in front of an administrative building in Tiraspol, with the territory’s red-green-red flag. Featuring a golden hammer and sickle, it was the official flag of the Moldovan Soviet Socialist Republic until the fall of the USSR and was adopted by the region in 2000. © Alexander Udodov
A man stands in front of the sign “I Love Ukraine” in Maidan Nezalezhnosti, the capital’s central square. Since the start of Ukraine's independence movement in 1990, the Maidan has been the site of political rallies including large-scale radical protest campaigns as well as the 2014 demonstrations. (February 24, 2022)
A man stands in front of the sign “I Love Ukraine” in Maidan Nezalezhnosti, the capital’s central square. Since the start of Ukraine's independence movement in 1990, the Maidan has been the site of political rallies including large-scale radical protest campaigns as well as the 2014 demonstrations. (February 24, 2022) © IWPR
Queues at bank machines in Irpin, a town of 60,000 in the Kyiv region’s northwest. (February 24, 2022)
Queues at bank machines in Irpin, a town of 60,000 in the Kyiv region’s northwest. (February 24, 2022) © IWPR
A message at a bank machine in Irpin states that it has run out of cash. (February 24, 2022)
A message at a bank machine in Irpin states that it has run out of cash. (February 24, 2022) © IWPR
On the horizon smoke comes from the Hostomel airport. About 10 kilometres from Kyiv, Hostomel is a key international cargo airfield and home to the Antonov aircraft company. Kyiv forces re-took control of the airfield after Russian troops tried to seize it. (February 24, 2022)
On the horizon smoke comes from the Hostomel airport. About 10 kilometres from Kyiv, Hostomel is a key international cargo airfield and home to the Antonov aircraft company. Kyiv forces re-took control of the airfield after Russian troops tried to seize it. (February 24, 2022) © IWPR
A long queue at a gas station starts in Irpin, just beyond Kyiv’s city boundary. (February 24, 2022)
A long queue at a gas station starts in Irpin, just beyond Kyiv’s city boundary. (February 24, 2022) © IWPR
A poster in downtown Kyiv calls on Ukrainians to join the Territorial Defence Unit, a military reserve component of the armed forces with auxiliary functions. (February 24, 2022)
A poster in downtown Kyiv calls on Ukrainians to join the Territorial Defence Unit, a military reserve component of the armed forces with auxiliary functions. (February 24, 2022) © IWPR
Khreshchatyk, Kyiv’s main street, is deserted in the early evening hours. (February 24, 2022)
Khreshchatyk, Kyiv’s main street, is deserted in the early evening hours. (February 24, 2022) © IWPR
People with travel bags rushing to a shelter in the centre of Kyiv. (February 24, 2022)
People with travel bags rushing to a shelter in the centre of Kyiv. (February 24, 2022) © IWPR
man sits in a parking lot in front of a closed shopping centre in Irpin, a town just beyond Kyiv’s city boundaries. (February 24, 2022)
man sits in a parking lot in front of a closed shopping centre in Irpin, a town just beyond Kyiv’s city boundaries. (February 24, 2022) © IWPR
The deserted parking lot of a large shopping centre in Irpin. (February 24, 2022)
The deserted parking lot of a large shopping centre in Irpin. (February 24, 2022) © IWPR
Lights in the gas station have been turned off, presumably to avoid drawing attention to crowded sites as the battle for control of the Hostomel airfield rages less than eight km away from Irpin. (February 24, 2022)
Lights in the gas station have been turned off, presumably to avoid drawing attention to crowded sites as the battle for control of the Hostomel airfield rages less than eight km away from Irpin. (February 24, 2022) © IWPR
Vasily and Yesenia walk in the deserted centre of Kyiv. “We went out for a walk in the evening. We feel more scared at home." (February 24, 2022)
Vasily and Yesenia walk in the deserted centre of Kyiv. “We went out for a walk in the evening. We feel more scared at home." (February 24, 2022) © IWPR
Staff in a supermarket in Bucha send customers away as it now operates with reduced working hours. (February 24, 2022)
Staff in a supermarket in Bucha send customers away as it now operates with reduced working hours. (February 24, 2022) © IWPR
Valery Fedulkin and Galina Fedulkina fled from Donetsk to Irpin in 2016 as they wanted to live away from the conflict. They lie on the bed near their “go” bags. (February 24, 2022)
Valery Fedulkin and Galina Fedulkina fled from Donetsk to Irpin in 2016 as they wanted to live away from the conflict. They lie on the bed near their “go” bags. (February 24, 2022) © IWPR
Lyudmila Kudelya, 73, hangs laundry near the ruins of her son's house, which burned down after a 120-mm mine hit their yard in February 2017. (February 3, 2022)
Lyudmila Kudelya, 73, hangs laundry near the ruins of her son's house, which burned down after a 120-mm mine hit their yard in February 2017. (February 3, 2022) © IWPR
Lyudmila on the doorstep of her house in Avdiivka. “Victor and I received this land slot from the [coke] plant. There was a pasture. We were young, strong. I remember on the first of May, on holidays, we cleared everything here and began to build the house.” (February 3, 2022)
Lyudmila on the doorstep of her house in Avdiivka. “Victor and I received this land slot from the [coke] plant. There was a pasture. We were young, strong. I remember on the first of May, on holidays, we cleared everything here and began to build the house.” (February 3, 2022) © IWPR
An abandoned house in the village of Pisky, in Donetsk region, bears the sign of heavy artillery. Before the war, the village had a population of about 3,000 people. Today only 40 remain, all of them elderly. (December 13, 2021)
An abandoned house in the village of Pisky, in Donetsk region, bears the sign of heavy artillery. Before the war, the village had a population of about 3,000 people. Today only 40 remain, all of them elderly. (December 13, 2021) © IWPR
A piano and the remains of belongings in an abandoned kindergarten in Pisky. The village lies a handful of kilometres from the airport of Donetsk. At the height of the fighting for the control of the airport, the village was a key crossing point for the Ukrainian army. The airport fell to the control of the Russian-backed militias in January 2015. (January 25, 2022)
A piano and the remains of belongings in an abandoned kindergarten in Pisky. The village lies a handful of kilometres from the airport of Donetsk. At the height of the fighting for the control of the airport, the village was a key crossing point for the Ukrainian army. The airport fell to the control of the Russian-backed militias in January 2015. (January 25, 2022) © IWPR
An old Soviet car in an abandoned house in Pisky, Donetsk region (December 13, 2021)
An old Soviet car in an abandoned house in Pisky, Donetsk region (December 13, 2021) © IWPR
A family photo album lies abandoned in an empty apartment building in Pisky, Donetsk region (January 25, 2022)
A family photo album lies abandoned in an empty apartment building in Pisky, Donetsk region (January 25, 2022) © IWPR
Sergiy, 58, at the window of his house in Avdiivka. In 2018, several 120 mm and 82 mm calibre mortar mines hit his yard. “A large mine fell in front of the house. A few more around the house. Thanks to the volunteers, one new window was set up. The second space for window I closed with boxes of sand. I do not want this all to start again. But I live in fear.” (February 3, 2022)
Sergiy, 58, at the window of his house in Avdiivka. In 2018, several 120 mm and 82 mm calibre mortar mines hit his yard. “A large mine fell in front of the house. A few more around the house. Thanks to the volunteers, one new window was set up. The second space for window I closed with boxes of sand. I do not want this all to start again. But I live in fear.” (February 3, 2022) © IWPR
An abandoned apartment building destroyed by heavy shelling in Pisky, Donetsk region. (December 15, 2021)
An abandoned apartment building destroyed by heavy shelling in Pisky, Donetsk region. (December 15, 2021) © IWPR
An abandoned house in the outskirts of Avdiivka. The city was subjected to constant heavy shelling between 2014 and 2018. (February 3, 2022)
An abandoned house in the outskirts of Avdiivka. The city was subjected to constant heavy shelling between 2014 and 2018. (February 3, 2022) © IWPR
In Avdiivka, Lidia, 61, looks after the house of her neighbour, Darya. In the spring of 2017, several 120 mm mortar rounds hit Darya’s yard. (February 3, 2022)
In Avdiivka, Lidia, 61, looks after the house of her neighbour, Darya. In the spring of 2017, several 120 mm mortar rounds hit Darya’s yard. (February 3, 2022) © IWPR
An abandoned house in the outskirts of Avdiivka, Donetsk region. Between January 29 and February 4 2017, the city was embroiled in heavy fighting, which left the city without electricity and heating for several days. (February 3, 2022)
An abandoned house in the outskirts of Avdiivka, Donetsk region. Between January 29 and February 4 2017, the city was embroiled in heavy fighting, which left the city without electricity and heating for several days. (February 3, 2022) © IWPR
Lyudmila, 73, stands near the remains of her son's house. (February 3, 2022)
Lyudmila, 73, stands near the remains of her son's house. (February 3, 2022) © IWPR
Lyudmila, 73, in her courtyard. After her son’s house was destroyed, he moved into a house in the same neighbourhood. (February 3, 2022)
Lyudmila, 73, in her courtyard. After her son’s house was destroyed, he moved into a house in the same neighbourhood. (February 3, 2022) © IWPR
A portrait of Victor Kudelya, Lyudmila’s husband, taken on February 25, 2017 after artillery from the Russian-backed militias hit his son’s house. He died in 2018.
A portrait of Victor Kudelya, Lyudmila’s husband, taken on February 25, 2017 after artillery from the Russian-backed militias hit his son’s house. He died in 2018. © IWPR
Abandoned apartment buildings in Pisky. (December 15, 2021) Due to the brutal shelling by the end of 2014, almost all residents had left the village.
Abandoned apartment buildings in Pisky. (December 15, 2021) Due to the brutal shelling by the end of 2014, almost all residents had left the village. © IWPR
Private houses, deeply damaged by shelling, in the outskirts of Avdiivka. The area between Avdiivka and the neighbouring Yasynuvata, under separatist control, remains one of the hotspots of the conflict. (February 3, 2022)
Private houses, deeply damaged by shelling, in the outskirts of Avdiivka. The area between Avdiivka and the neighbouring Yasynuvata, under separatist control, remains one of the hotspots of the conflict. (February 3, 2022) © IWPR
A damaged and abandoned private house in the outskirts of Avdiivka. (February 3, 2022)
A damaged and abandoned private house in the outskirts of Avdiivka. (February 3, 2022) © IWPR
Ukrainian servicemen in the trenches near the town of Avdiivka, Donetsk region. (January 8, 2022)
Ukrainian servicemen in the trenches near the town of Avdiivka, Donetsk region. (January 8, 2022) © IWPR
A Ukrainian serviceman fires a machine gun during a night battle with Russian-backed separatists in frontline positions near the village of Zolote, Luhansk region. (September 22, 2021)
A Ukrainian serviceman fires a machine gun during a night battle with Russian-backed separatists in frontline positions near the village of Zolote, Luhansk region. (September 22, 2021) © IWPR
Ukrainian servicemen in frontline positions in an industrial area close to the town of Avdiivka town, Donetsk region. (December 10, 2021)
Ukrainian servicemen in frontline positions in an industrial area close to the town of Avdiivka town, Donetsk region. (December 10, 2021) © IWPR
Ukrainian servicemen dig a trench along the frontline near the town of Avdiivka, Donetsk region. (January 8, 2022)
Ukrainian servicemen dig a trench along the frontline near the town of Avdiivka, Donetsk region. (January 8, 2022) © IWPR
Ukrainian servicemen move along frontline positions near the town of Avdiivka, Donetsk region. (January 8, 2022)
Ukrainian servicemen move along frontline positions near the town of Avdiivka, Donetsk region. (January 8, 2022) © IWPR
Ukrainian servicemen near the village of Zolote, Lugansk region. (January 22, 2022)
Ukrainian servicemen near the village of Zolote, Lugansk region. (January 22, 2022) © IWPR
A Ukrainian serviceman pets a cat while on duty at a frontline position near Avdiivka, Donetsk region. (January 9, 2022)
A Ukrainian serviceman pets a cat while on duty at a frontline position near Avdiivka, Donetsk region. (January 9, 2022) © IWPR
A Ukrainian soldier with his dog is on the frontline not far from the village of Zolote, Lugansk region. Only 16 people remain in the village. The youngest is 59 years old. (January 21, 2022)
A Ukrainian soldier with his dog is on the frontline not far from the village of Zolote, Lugansk region. Only 16 people remain in the village. The youngest is 59 years old. (January 21, 2022) © IWPR
A Ukrainian soldier walks along a trench at the front positions near the village of Zolote, Luhansk region. (January 22, 2022)
A Ukrainian soldier walks along a trench at the front positions near the village of Zolote, Luhansk region. (January 22, 2022) © IWPR
A poster of Russian President Vladimir Putin is used as target practice at the frontline position of Ukrainian Military Force near Zolote village, Lugansk region. (January 22, 2022)
A poster of Russian President Vladimir Putin is used as target practice at the frontline position of Ukrainian Military Force near Zolote village, Lugansk region. (January 22, 2022) © IWPR
A house destroyed by artillery in the village of Pisky, close to Donetsk airport. Before the war, the village had a population of about 3,000 people, today only 40 remain. (January 25, 2022)
A house destroyed by artillery in the village of Pisky, close to Donetsk airport. Before the war, the village had a population of about 3,000 people, today only 40 remain. (January 25, 2022) © IWPR
A dog wanders around the physics classroom in a school destroyed by artillery in the village of Pisky, controlled by the Ukrainian government. At the height of the fighting in 2014 and 2015, Ukrainian troops entered the Donetsk airport through Pisky. (January 25, 2022)
A dog wanders around the physics classroom in a school destroyed by artillery in the village of Pisky, controlled by the Ukrainian government. At the height of the fighting in 2014 and 2015, Ukrainian troops entered the Donetsk airport through Pisky. (January 25, 2022) © IWPR
Ukrainian servicemen prepare dinner in a shelter at a frontline position near the village of Verkhnetoretske, Donetsk region. (January 31, 2022)
Ukrainian servicemen prepare dinner in a shelter at a frontline position near the village of Verkhnetoretske, Donetsk region. (January 31, 2022) © IWPR
Rubbish pile up on the side of the village’s muddy, unpaved streets. Residents complain that when it is dry, the roads are dusty and when it rains, they are muddy. Taxi drivers are unwilling to take passengers here.
Rubbish pile up on the side of the village’s muddy, unpaved streets. Residents complain that when it is dry, the roads are dusty and when it rains, they are muddy. Taxi drivers are unwilling to take passengers here. © CABAR
The impoverished village of Prigorodny lies 10 kilometres from the shiny centre of Kazakhstan’s capital Nur-Sultan. The settlement of a few thousands lacks a policlinic and other basic services.
The impoverished village of Prigorodny lies 10 kilometres from the shiny centre of Kazakhstan’s capital Nur-Sultan. The settlement of a few thousands lacks a policlinic and other basic services. © CABAR
Collecting water from a standpipe is a daily chore for hundreds as most houses do not have running water. Queues start in the early hours and on weekends people stand for to four hours.
Collecting water from a standpipe is a daily chore for hundreds as most houses do not have running water. Queues start in the early hours and on weekends people stand for to four hours. © CABAR
“We used to have seven standpipes. Now only one is functioning and the water is salty,” lamented Yury Nazharov. In winter, the standpipe freezes, and it gets even worse. We have written requests of help, but to no avail.”
“We used to have seven standpipes. Now only one is functioning and the water is salty,” lamented Yury Nazharov. In winter, the standpipe freezes, and it gets even worse. We have written requests of help, but to no avail.” © CABAR
Nurdaulet Abdukarimov is a dentistry student. “I work part-time in a shopping mall in the capital. Every day is a struggle, my footwear cannot last longer than one season. What I earn is enough to pay for a pair of boots. I’ve been living here for ten years and have not seen any changes.”
Nurdaulet Abdukarimov is a dentistry student. “I work part-time in a shopping mall in the capital. Every day is a struggle, my footwear cannot last longer than one season. What I earn is enough to pay for a pair of boots. I’ve been living here for ten years and have not seen any changes.” © CABAR
The closest school is 1.5 kilometres away from the village and there is no public transport. Not every household has a car and those with no private vehicles must walk their children to school. As the roads have no tarmac, rain and snow turn them into large mud trails.
The closest school is 1.5 kilometres away from the village and there is no public transport. Not every household has a car and those with no private vehicles must walk their children to school. As the roads have no tarmac, rain and snow turn them into large mud trails. © CABAR
Yadviga Sosnovskaya, a retired flight attendant, has been living in Prigorodny for 47 years. “In the past, people working in aviation and geology lived here. Now people have cars and have tried to pave the road by themselves, but we have run out of money.”
Yadviga Sosnovskaya, a retired flight attendant, has been living in Prigorodny for 47 years. “In the past, people working in aviation and geology lived here. Now people have cars and have tried to pave the road by themselves, but we have run out of money.” © CABAR
A newly built football pitch in the village of Karaoktel, about 20 kilometres from Nur-Sultan. The village is divided into two parts, and only one of them falls under the jurisdiction of the capital, and as such it has schools, a kindergarten and a hospital.
A newly built football pitch in the village of Karaoktel, about 20 kilometres from Nur-Sultan. The village is divided into two parts, and only one of them falls under the jurisdiction of the capital, and as such it has schools, a kindergarten and a hospital. © CABAR
The village is home to about 20,000 people, who either work in small farms or are employed in the capital. Many are pensioners.
The village is home to about 20,000 people, who either work in small farms or are employed in the capital. Many are pensioners. © CABAR
“We rent temporary premises, it is the cheapest housing. My husband works in the capital. We have nine children. houses here have no indoor sanitation, and it is very humid in winter,” says Gulim Rakhmetova.
“We rent temporary premises, it is the cheapest housing. My husband works in the capital. We have nine children. houses here have no indoor sanitation, and it is very humid in winter,” says Gulim Rakhmetova. © CABAR
Zhagalau is a new large residential area in the outskirts of Nur-Sultan. It is rapidly growing and the local akimat, the municipal authorities, are supporting the rapid development of local infrastructure.
Zhagalau is a new large residential area in the outskirts of Nur-Sultan. It is rapidly growing and the local akimat, the municipal authorities, are supporting the rapid development of local infrastructure. © CABAR
Zhaksylyk Bekzhanov, a pensioner, has bought a two-room apartment for 14 million tenges (36,900 US dollars). “The area is very good. We have a common area, stores, a playground. The beach is under construction. The only thing we miss is a parking lot.”
Zhaksylyk Bekzhanov, a pensioner, has bought a two-room apartment for 14 million tenges (36,900 US dollars). “The area is very good. We have a common area, stores, a playground. The beach is under construction. The only thing we miss is a parking lot.” © CABAR
The public transport network provides good connection to the capital. It includes heated bus stops equipped with the information system and Wi-Fi.
The public transport network provides good connection to the capital. It includes heated bus stops equipped with the information system and Wi-Fi. © CABAR
Kazakstan's capital Nur-Sultan, with flashy, glistening buildings provides a stark contrast to the villages with no running water and basic services just outside of the city.
Kazakstan's capital Nur-Sultan, with flashy, glistening buildings provides a stark contrast to the villages with no running water and basic services just outside of the city. © Leon Neal - Pool/Getty Images
Roza Eftekhari 1961-2021
Roza Eftekhari 1961-2021
IN MEMORIAM

Roza Eftekhari – a Tribute

IWPR mourns long-time friend and colleague who made a profound contribution to regional democracy.

In the News

Kevin Frayer/Getty Images
焦点

關於 戰爭與和平報導研究所

IWPR 关注中国大陆地区以外的华文社群,培育独立新闻。我们协助各类媒体机构,无论其规模大小,寻找并分享海外华文媒体所采取的最佳商业实践和拓展受众的策略,以支持其未来发展。

焦点

AFGHANISTAN

We at IWPR are deeply saddened and concerned by the situation in Afghanistan and our thoughts go out to all those affected. If you are a former employee or partner of IWPR in Afghanistan and need to contact us about your situation please use the address below.

اگر قبلا در افغانستان با ما کار کرده‌اید و نیاز به تماس با ما دارید، سریع ایمیل بزنید:

afghanistan.helpdesk@iwpr.net

Hamid Karzai International Airport, Afghanistan, Aug. 21, 2021.
Hamid Karzai International Airport, Afghanistan, Aug. 21, 2021. © U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Taylor Crul

IWPR's journalism illustrated by stunning photography thanks to support from GettyImages.

Demonstrators participate in an anti-Lukashenko rally on August 18, 2020 in Minsk, Belarus.
Demonstrators participate in an anti-Lukashenko rally on August 18, 2020 in Minsk, Belarus. © Misha Friedman/Getty Images
Pigeons fly after being fed by Syrians in the courtyard of the Omayad mosque October 18, 2002 in Damascus, Syria.
Pigeons fly after being fed by Syrians in the courtyard of the Omayad mosque October 18, 2002 in Damascus, Syria. © Chris Hondros/Getty Images
A young woman talks on her mobile phone as she walks past a mural depicting (L-R) Cuban Comunist Party founder Julio Antonio Mella and Cuban revolutionary leaders Camilo Cienfuegos and Che Guevara in the Habana Vieja neighborhood January 24, 2015 in Havana, Cuba.
A young woman talks on her mobile phone as she walks past a mural depicting (L-R) Cuban Comunist Party founder Julio Antonio Mella and Cuban revolutionary leaders Camilo Cienfuegos and Che Guevara in the Habana Vieja neighborhood January 24, 2015 in Havana, Cuba. © Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
Displaced Syrian girls wear face masks decorated by artists during a COVID-19 awareness campaign at the Bardaqli camp in Syria's Idlib province, on April 20, 2020.
Displaced Syrian girls wear face masks decorated by artists during a COVID-19 awareness campaign at the Bardaqli camp in Syria's Idlib province, on April 20, 2020. © AAREF WATAD/AFP via Getty Images
Children sit chatting in a street ravaged by pro-regime forces air strikes, in the town of Ariha in the southern countryside of the Idlib province on April 11, 2020.
Children sit chatting in a street ravaged by pro-regime forces air strikes, in the town of Ariha in the southern countryside of the Idlib province on April 11, 2020. © AAREF WATAD/AFP via Getty Images
Rohingya refugees walk across fields at dusk after crossing the border from Myanmar on September 09, 2017 in Gundum, Bangladesh.
Rohingya refugees walk across fields at dusk after crossing the border from Myanmar on September 09, 2017 in Gundum, Bangladesh. © Dan Kitwood/Getty Images
Refugees wait near their shelters in the village of Tongo, in the hills outside Goma, on November 4, 2008 in North Kivu province, Democratic Republic of Congo.
Refugees wait near their shelters in the village of Tongo, in the hills outside Goma, on November 4, 2008 in North Kivu province, Democratic Republic of Congo. © Uriel Sinai/Getty Images
Boys play on a street next to a building destroyed by war more than twenty years earlier on April 18, 2015 in Shushi, Nagorno-Karabakh.
Boys play on a street next to a building destroyed by war more than twenty years earlier on April 18, 2015 in Shushi, Nagorno-Karabakh. © Brendan Hoffman/Getty Images
Rohingya Muslim refugees wait to board boats over a creek after crossing the Myanmar Bangladesh border on September 07, 2017 in Whaikhyang, Bangladesh.
Rohingya Muslim refugees wait to board boats over a creek after crossing the Myanmar Bangladesh border on September 07, 2017 in Whaikhyang, Bangladesh. © Dan Kitwood/Getty Images
Northern Iraqi Kurds Hendrin Usman (L) and Ubeid Hasen look out a window of their house adorned with doves June 16, 2003 in a village near Erbil, Iraq.
Northern Iraqi Kurds Hendrin Usman (L) and Ubeid Hasen look out a window of their house adorned with doves June 16, 2003 in a village near Erbil, Iraq. © Mario Tama/Getty Images
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